Saturday, October 12, 2013

The Legend of Gapan in Nueva Ecija (Alamat ng Gapan, Nueva Ecija)

(Gapan, Nueva Ecija)

Long ago, there was a very stubborn kid named Dodoy. He doesn’t follow his mother’s orders. Instead, he does the things that annoy her most.
One morning, Dodoy decided to have a trip in the rice fields. He kept on walking until he doesn’t know where he is already. He got lost to the point that he has no idea of how to come home. Due to exhaustion, he fell asleep under a tree.

Meanwhile, Dodoy’s mother is sick with worry. Someone told her that he saw Dodoy circling the rice fields near a large tree and is seemed to be caught under an enchanted spell.
Dodoy was awakened by a loud cry of a naked infant with a bulging stomach. The baby was lying on a banana leaf on the ground. Dodoy took the baby in his arms and attempted to stop him from crying. It didn’t stop from wailing and this greatly annoyed Dodoy. He was about to slap the baby when it mysteriously transformed into a filthy old man with very long hair and beard. Dodoy was so shocked that he dropped what he was holding and scrammed off his feet.

When he turned his head back, his fear increased for the old man disappeared. He ran and ran but he seemed to be stuck in the same spot. He was trapped in that situation until the sun set down. Exhaustion brought him down to his knees. With his remaining energy, he crawled just to get away from that bamboo grove. 

Dodoy’s mother waited and waited until she saw Dodoy crawling towards their yard. Dodoy was extremely dissipated since he crawled all the way home. It turned out that dwarves jested on him. “That’s what stubborn kids get,” his mother scolded him. Yet, she was glad that her son was back.

From then on, it has become a saying amongst the townspeople that “You might end up like Dodoy, gapang ng gapang (always crawling).” That is why the place near the bamboo grove where Dodoy crawled was named Gapan (from gapang, meaning to crawl). Until now, that town in Nueva Ecija, in the island of Luzon, is still called Gapan.


Translated from Rene Alba's "Mga Alamat Pilipino (Para sa Mag-aaral)", published 1914 by Century Publications.

No comments:

Post a Comment